现金捕鱼官方Nelly Kelly: ‘The provocation was for people to interact with the Bible, to write their way back in and reclaim their space within it’

Nelly Kelly: ‘The provocation was for people to interact with the Bible, to write their way back in and reclaim their space within it’

  • Gareth K Vile
  • 12 October 2019

Nelly Kelly: 'The provocation was for people to interact with the Bible, to write their way back in and reclaim their space within it'

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

The playwright reflects on contemporary activism ahead of the first rehearsed reading of new project Untitled 2009, inspired by the GoMA exhibition of the same name

As part of the celebrations surrounding the tenth anniversary of Jo Clifford’s The Gospel According to Jesus, Queen of Heaven, playwright Nelly Kelly revisits an event that happened as part of the 2009 Glasgay! festival that gave Clifford’s play its premiere.

Untitled 2009 was part of the exhibition Made in God’s Image at the GOMA and received similar amounts of controversy to Jesus, Queen of Heaven,’ Kelly says. ‘I have long been interested in the ways in which queer people can dismantle the internalised homophobia and transphobia inflicted on us by major power structures through reclaiming power and space from those structures. This exhibition felt like it was actively doing that which is why I was very excited to come on board as the writer.’

The exhibition placed a Bible in GOMA and invited visitors to ‘write their way back into it’. ‘I’d argue that it’s not about rewriting history,’ Kelly continues. ‘The provocation was for people to interact with the Bible, to write their way back in and reclaim their space within it.’ Noting that the piece was ‘ahead of its time’, Kelly believes that its approach fits with contemporary activism. ‘It seems like there is a stronger cultural awareness nowadays in terms of the writing of history being dominated by white, straight, cisgender men as well as an acknowledgement of the resulting loss of rich diversity. I do think that there is more activism in response to unravelling this idea of past and having those silenced throughout history identify their own voices and actions throughout that.’

Taking the texts that were written into the margins of the exhibited Bible as inspiration, Kelly admits that ‘this has, without doubt, presented me with my biggest challenge to date as a writer. This is in part due to the writing work I am used to creating as, until now, I have never worked with anything but my own imagination. There is huge complexity in taking the fragmented thoughts, feelings and ideas of people written into a Bible in an exhibit that I never visited and turning it into a piece of theatre.’

‘The complexities are 捕鱼王者现金安卓版two-fold, the first being that it is difficult to take very fragmented statements and combine them in a way that has enough of a dramatic structure to provide an engaging piece of theatre,’ she continues. ‘The other is upon finding a potential dramatic structure in which this could work, how do you weave through this narrative in a way that doesn’t give bias to your own charged thoughts on religion when these thoughts are so highly mirrored in such a large amount of the entries people made?’ The process has challenged Kelly to consider how personal bias, either for or against religious faith, impacts on creativity.

‘The inspirations that have surprised me most by far are the people who have caused me to have my own revelations regarding faith versus religion. As part of my writing process I very actively tried to engage with LGBTQIA+ people of faith in conversations about religion. Having these conversations left me inspired by those who still have unshakeable faith in their God, even after facing direct persecution by the power structures of their religious institutions.’

Untitled 2009 considers both the history of activism, and the ways that it has developed over the past decade – Kelly acknowledges that while some progress has been made, there are plenty of identities that still experience persecution– and provides a timely reminder of the necessity of continued action.

Tron Theatre, Glasgow, Sat 2 Nov, tron.co.uk.

有信誉好的捕鱼赢现金The simple yet sustainable way to explore the best tourist spots and hidden gems in Scotland

The simple yet sustainable way to explore the best tourist spots and hidden gems in Scotland

  • This advertising feature is brought to you by VisitScotland. Find out more.
  • 11 October 2019

The simple yet sustainable way to explore the best tourist spots and hidden gems in Scotland

West Highland Line / credit: Scotrail

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Here are just some ways to see the most stunning and interesting parts of the country via rail, bus, coach and ferry

When it comes to exploring Scotland, it’s as much about the journey and admiring the stunning landscapes on your way to your destination. Many of us are looking for simple w最新捕鱼棋牌真钱app6ays to make travelling more sustainable, and using public transport is an easy step to get started.

Scotland’s public transport network is far-spread and cost-effective; you’ll find that travelling to the main tourist spots is a piece of cake and, with a little careful planning, remote areas are readily accessible too.

By Rail

All aboard! With rail connections to each of Scotland’s seven cities, the railway offers dozens of unforgettable journeys with great service and amazing views.

On the West Highland Line, known to millions as the railway that took Harry Potter to Hogwarts, stop off at Arisaig to take a walk along one of the Highlands’ best beaches, then explore the charming Mallaig Bay at the end of the line. Or take one of Britain’s most rural railways, the Far North Lines which connects Inverness with Thurso and Wick at the northern limits of the Highlands.

Alternatively, start your adventure in Glasgow and make your way along the south west coast, travelling past glorious golf courses, brilliant beaches, and the land that inspired Robert Burns. With the unlimited Spirit of Scotland Travelpass you can hop on and off at any stop. You can even include a little venture to the Isle of Arran on this trip. Or enjoy one of the other scenic routes around the south of the country: see the best of Ayrshire and Dumfries & Galloway along the Glasgow-Kilmarnock-Carlisle Line. The Borders’ Railway will take you through the breath-taking landscapes of Edinburgh, Midlothian and the Scottish Borders, to discover its rich history and thrilling outdoor activities.

手机版捕鱼金币换现金Queer Theory – Riotous queer cabaret night is a chaotic delight

Queer Theory (4 stars)

  • Lorna Irvine
  • 11 October 2019

Queer Theory

credit: Kirsty Law

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Riotous queer cabaret night is a chaotic delight

Queer Theory’s monthly club night at Sleazy’s is quickly becoming something of an institution and tonight demonstrates why. It’s chaotic, fun and inclusive, but there is a political fury underpinning even the most knockabout moments.

Impish compere Craig Manson excels here, proving there’s nothing that can’t be improved with a bit of interpretive dance. There is no way to ever scrub off his unique reimagining of a Sam Smith video.

Elsewhere, Alternative Cracks provide oppositional anthems to incels and the alt-right, their schtick like Flanders and Swann on temazepam and bath salts. Cat Reilly’s stand up is ridiculously smart, and Eve Jeffrey’s world-weary poetry is brimming with comic exasperation, but Kat Ennis’ eye watering confessionals on sex work are as disarmingly brutal as they’re hilarious and insightful. Sissy Jacqueline brings a ritualistic beauty to performance art: it’s bodybuilding with grace and almost Zen-like quietude.

Musician Ben Seal’s little vignettes are eccentric, charming and acerbic. Teetering between high art and high camp, songs like ‘Death’ and ‘Kristal’ have an electro pop sheen with heart. Seal’s not afraid to subvert the humble vocoder too. He then invites the irrepressible Manson back onto the stage to channel his inner Pan’s People to the finale. It’s all naughty in the nicest ways.

The Gospel According to 捕鱼棋牌现金平台Queer Theory, Mono, Glasgow, Fri 1 Nov.

2017最新现金捕鱼游戏The Drift – Heartbreak and rage collide in Lavery’s deep dive into the roots of intergenerational trauma

The Drift (4 stars)

  • Deborah Chu
  • 11 October 2019

The Drift

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Heartbreak and rage collide in Lavery’s deep dive into the roots of intergenerational trauma

In The Drift, spoken word perf361现金捕鱼网站ormer Hannah Lavery’s memories of her troubled, absentee father are inextricably intertwined with historical remembrance of a different sort. A past no less troubled, and one that’s startlingly absent from the annals of history books, but pervasive all the same: that of Scotland’s role in the atrocities of empire. On stage, Lavery directs her rage and heartbreak – both personal and national – at an empty chair, symbolic of the father who abandoned her and her mother at a young age, and whom she’d just begun to re-establish a relationship with when he died suddenly in 2014.

Lavery is a spellbinding performer, and an expert at negotiating the tension in the room. Moments of pitch-black humour burst forth in unexpected places, but more often she holds her listeners at the cliff-edge, forcing her majority-white audience to face the legacy of brutality and rape that has formed her, a mixed-race Scot. But she’s also seeking a post-mortem redemption for her father, sourcing his failures and violence in this brutal inheritance, and the racism that she and her young sons now also face as ‘exotic others’ in their own home.

Few works of Scottish theatre confront the hypocrisies of Scottish nationalism and identity so bluntly, and so well. Lavery lyrically acknowledges the conflicting emotions of love and resentment she feels towards both her father and her homeland, but does not attempt to stamp out one feeling in favour of the other. They should – and must – find a way to co-exist, just as the nation too must allow for more than one story of Scotland to be told.

Reviewed at Traverse Theatre, Thu 10 Oct.

现金单机捕鱼ios版The Sweetest Growl – Elaine C Smith excels in stomping musical

The Sweetest Growl (4 stars)

  • Lorna Irvine
  • 11 October 2019

The Sweetest Growl

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Elaine C Smith excels in stomping musical

Swapping her iconic Mary Doll role for another equally gallus Mary, Ms McGowan of the Clyde Valley Stompers, is the irrepressible Elaine C Smith. Claire Nicol’s musical about the Gorbals gal, perceptively directed by Lesley Hart, is both poignant and hilarious.

McGowan is first seen backstage, wondering if sh免费捕鱼赢现金游戏大厅e can go ahead with a reunion, having eschewed a promising career for motherhood and a marriage to demanding Merchant Navy man Robert Menzies (George Drennan) in spite of possessing a fantastic jazz voice.

Nicol’s script is conventional, yet has a lot of heart, and the emphasis on McGowan’s friendship – and subsequent rivalry with – the less talented, but equally likeable Kate Tierney (Hilary Lyon) is key to what makes the show so compelling. The complex dynamics of women and career pressure as the sixties approached are put under the spotlight, and given as much weight as Smith’s fabulous voice and charisma.

Smith’s comic timing is superb, and Lyon and Drennan play a variety of roles with elan. The childhood flashbacks are never too cloying: sweet yes, but there’s a lot of cheek there, too. After all, you can take the girl out of Glasgow …

Oran Mor Glasgow, until Sat 12 Oct; Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, Tue 15–Sat 19 Oct; Lemon Tree, Aberdeen, Tue 22 Oct–Sat 26 Oct.

2019现金棋牌捕鱼娱乐Gary McNair: ‘Puns are a simple, joyous pleasure’

Gary McNair: ‘Puns are a simple, joyous pleasure’

  • Jay Richardson
  • 11 October 2019

Gary McNair: 'Puns are a simple, joyous pleasure'

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

As the 6th Annual Champipunship prepares to unleash another night of unfettered wordplay, its playwright creator Gary McNair tells us why it’s his favourite night of the year

More polarising than a Ricky Gervais transgender gag or a Louis CK comeback gig, puns are arguably the most divisive form of comedy, spanning the ridiculous, the sublime and the creakily naff. Happily, the Annual Champipunship rewards punsters that elicit both laughs and groans, acknowledging that in the realm of convoluted and inspired wordplay, brevity can be the soul of wit and shit.

Celebrating its sixth year of competition, the Champipunship is now well established. Founder and MC Gary McNair likens it to ‘my second birthday. It’s my favourite night of the year. I adore puns. It’s a very quick way to bond with people. At the heart of a pun is taking something that seems to make sense one way, inverting it, and somehow it becomes funny. Which is the underlying basis of comedy. In writing plays, all I want to do is make someone stop and look at something they’ve already looked at slightly differently. And that’s completely what a pun does. When they’re good there’s nothing more satisfying.’

Featuring a line-up of seasoned pundamentalists and newcomers, with spaces available for a few more, McNair advises wannabe wordsmiths fancying a (w有哪些真钱捕鱼的软件ise) crack at the title to get in touch via his Twitter account. Through an inventive series of rounds, with costume, visual and musical elements – facilitated by house band The Pun Lovin’ Criminals – and a raffle for mental-health charity Tiny Changes, there’s also plenty of opportunity for the crowd to join in.

‘The competitors always get to have a go first and then we open it out to the audience,’ McNair explains. ‘That’s where a lot of the big laughs come from because there are so many people who love puns and are ready to shout out. They’re only allowed to heckle me though, no one else. Puns are a simple, joyous pleasure for everyone.’

The 6th Annual Champipunship, Òran Mór, Glasgow, Wednesday 16 October.

现金网上捕鱼Ben Elton: Live – Motormouth strikes again with a great new show that has him struggling to finding his place in the world

Ben Elton: Live (4 stars)

  • Brian Donaldson
  • 11 October 2019

Ben Elton: Live

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Motormouth strikes again with a great new show that has him struggling to finding his place in the world

Pulling off the twin aims of coming across as curmudgeonly and contemporary is no mean feat. Yet somehow, for his first stand-up tour in 15 years, Ben Elton achieves this near impossible task. Grumpily denouncing the music tastes of his offspring (in full acknowledgment of how decrepit this makes him sound) and the widespread artisanisation of alcohol (he genuinely maintains that such ‘progress’ is plain wrong), this 60-year-old veteran of the alternative comedy wars from the late 70s/early 80s, still shows more sensitivity of issues revolving around gender and sexuality than many other middle-aged male comics (yes, Richard, David and William, we’re probably thinking of you).

Elton might not have been bothered to come up with a proper title for his show, but there is a vague theme binding it all together, instilled in the repeated mantra that ‘I no longer get what I once got’. Trying to negotiate a path through this era of the 21st century is confusing enough without it making him question what he previously believed were the old certainties. He even forces himself to make a reluctant nod towards the integrity of deceased right-wing warhorses such as Reagan and Thatcher, who he reckons at least had some principles when set aside the current haphazard leaders of America and Britain. Indeed, our current PM (when last we looked) is given a proper going over in Elton’s climactic whirlwind as he takes to task those who insist that Boris Johnson is actually funny.

While much has changed since he last zipped around the country, Elton’s trademark breathless style is perfectly intact. Dubbed during his mid-80s Saturday Live heyday as Motormouth, the shiny jacket and dark mullet have gone, replaced by safe M&S polo shirts (he even has a ‘costume change’ at the interval) and whiter, thinner hair. An ability to leave audiences gasping for air is also still in his armoury, and there are excellent passages about his wife手机版现金捕鱼’s late-night mobile-phone usage, and imagining what care homes will look like once our millennials are populating them.

There are some who will simply find it impossible to forgive him for his past cultural indiscretions (he’s firmly on the defensive here about working with Tories such as Andrew Lloyd Webber) including the likes of Get a Grip (his deservedly short-lived ITV satirical show with Alexa Chung) and risible sitcom The Wright Way which have done their best to stain a TV writing career that began with era-defining landmarks such as The Young Ones and Blackadder. But on stage is where he seems to be at his most productive now. It will hopefully not be another decade and a half before we get to hear more of his 90mph outpourings on cultural and social trends.

Ben Elton: Live is on tour until Saturday 30 November. Seen at Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh.

闲趣捕鱼 现金TSHA: ‘I don’t fully believe in manifestation but I do think that writing things down has made a lot of my goals just happen’

TSHA: ‘I don’t fully believe in manifestation but I do think that writing things down has made a lot of my goals just happen’

  • Kate Walker
  • 11 October 2019

TSHA: 'I don't fully believe in manifestation but I do think that writing things down has made a lot of my goals just happen'

credit: Kiran Gidda

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

London-based producer reflects on her hectic summer and upcoming second EP, Moonlight

Back in May 2018, TSHA wrote down a plan for her career as a musician. Her goals included ‘decide artist name’ and ‘DJ festivals’. Right at the top was ‘make a three track EP’, and ‘release music on a good label’ was on the ‘3 year’ branch of her wishl2015版捕鱼现金下载平台ist mindmap. An 18-month whirlwind later, and the London-based producer has ticked off every one of these goals and more. We caught up with TSHA the day after she got home from a hectic summer playing festivals, as she finally had some time to recover and reflect on her rapid ascension through the electronic music ranks.

TSHA’s first EP, Dawn, was self-released in August 2018, and caught the ears of many, including of Bonobo (her idol) who then included her single ‘Sacred’ on his Fabric Presents compilation. Excitement about her music snowballed, with residencies on Worldwide FM and guest slots on Rinse FM, quickly leading TSHA to a manager and a deal with her favourite record label, Ninja Tune. ‘It was like a chain reaction,’ says TSHA, ‘I don’t fully believe in, like, manifestation, or anything like that, but I do think that writing things down has made a lot of my goals just kind of happen? I think it makes you apply yourself more, and it becomes solidified in your mind.’ The momentum continued and in August this year TSHA announced her second EP, Moonlight, and released her single ‘Moon’, a bassy, melodic groove, crammed with breakbeats and catchy steel drum samples.

2018最新送现金捕鱼游戏NOW That’s What I Call The ’80s Live tour announced, tickets are on sale now

NOW That’s What I Call The ’80s Live tour announced, tickets are on sale now

  • Julia Kajdi
  • 11 October 2019

NOW That's What I Call The '80s Live tour announced, tickets are on sale now

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Seven dates announced for first NOW That’s What I Call The ’80s Live tour in the UK

NOW That’s What I Call The ’80s Live tour is coming to wow audiences with a series of live concerts featuring the best and biggest songs from the fruitful decade of the ’80s. Tickets for the shows are on sale now.

The first ever ’80s UK live tour has been put together by the team at NOW That’s What I Call Music, the UK’s biggest compilation series. Fans can sing along, dance or just relax to all time hits like ‘Relax’ by Frankie Goes to Hollywood, ‘The Final Countdown’ by Europe, ‘Purple Rain’ by Prince, ‘Livin’ On A Prayer’ by Bon Jovi, and ‘Gold’ by Spandau Ballet. To represent the decade’s musical richness, the live tour will feature songs from all the major genres of the ’80s from pop and rock through heavy metal to punk. Get ready for Madonna, U2, AC/DC, Simple Minds and much more.

Now That’s What I Call Music has been immensely popular since it started back in 1983 with over 100 compilations being released, selling millions of albums and putting on tours all over the world.

The NOW That’s What I Call The ’80s Live tour stops in Leicester, Birmingham, Manchester, Edinburgh, Glasgow, London, and Cardiff in Nov and Dec 2019.

NOW That’s What I Call The ’80s Live 2019 tour dates:
Fri 15 Nov – De Montfort Hall, Leicester
Sat 16 Nov – Symphony Hall, Birmingham
Sun 17 Nov – Bridgewater Hall, Manchester
Sat 23 Nov – Usher Hall, Edinburgh
Sun 24 Nov – Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow
Fri 29 Nov – Royal Festival Hall, London
Sun 1 Dec – St David’s Hall, Cardiff

Tickets fo手机真钱捕鱼0.01元r NOW That’s What I Call The ’80s Live tour are on sale now.

波克捕鱼刷现金Greed review – LFF 2019: Michael Winterbottom and Steve Coogan reteam for an enjoyable but insufficiently scathing satire

Greed (3 stars)

  • Katherine McLaughlin
  • 11 October 2019

Greed

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

LFF 2019: Michael Winterbottom and Steve Coogan reteam for an enjoyable but insufficiently scathing satire

‘I don’t want them at my party,’ whines fashion tycoon Sir Richard ‘Greedy’ McCreadie (Steve Coogan, turning in a performance of typical gusto as an obnoxious arsehole) when he finds Syrian refugees camped out on a Mykonos beach, right by the amphitheatre he has had built for his lavish 60th birthday celebrations. Michael Winterbottom’s pointed satire is part Greek tragedy and part takedown of the super-rich, who manipulate an already rigged system for gain while gambling with people’s lives.

Though it never explicitly states it, the film takes obvious inspiration from the Arcadia Group’s Philip Green, once known as ‘King of the High Street’. David Mitchell takes on the role of official biographer to McCreadie, with the narrative following a rich-to-richer arc. As he goes behind the scenes of a wealthy clan things get increasingly dark, with the film inserting snippets of parliamentary testimony and flashbacks to dodgy business deals. McCreadie’s monstrous family include his financially savvy ex (Isla Fisher), his son (Asa Butterfield), daughter (Sophie Cookson), trophy wife (Shanina Shaik) and mother (Shirley Henderson, under prosthetics for much of the duration). Asim Chaudhry also appears as a lion tamer.

As a comedy, it’s enjoyably funny but never feels clever enough to be truly scathing. Winterbottom names and shames companies and celebrities who are complicit in furthering the capitalist nightmare. He’s clearly seething at the state of the nation but takes aim at too many targets; reality TV, tax evasion, sweatshops and the migration crisis all get a look in but Winte24小时现金兑换手机捕鱼rbottom uses certain characters as plot devices rather than investing them with their own humanity. This is especially galling in the case of a Sri Lankan-born employee (played by Dinita Gohil) with a tragic backstory. The material is undoubtedly blood-boiling but, in its imperfect execution, Greed ends up feeling like an opportunity missed.

Screening on Wed 9, Thu 10 and Sun 13 Oct as part of the BFI London Film Festival 2019. General release from Fri 21 Feb.